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SPACE at European Indoor Hockey Tournament

News

SPACE physio Ross Mayberry spent part of last week off in icy Oslo providing support for Inverleith Hockey Club. Read on below to find out how he and the team got on….

 

Those of you following on social media may have noticed that last week I was away with Inverleith Hockey Club to support them in their European Indoor Hockey Tournament. As a club Inverleith are no strangers to European competition having represented Scottish clubs as national champions on four occasions since 2015. That said this particular tournament saw a changing of the guard as it where with some newer (albeit experienced) younger faces, with no less than 6 internationalists missing form the campaign in Russia 3 years ago. The previous year Menziehill where relegated from the B division into the C division, and the responsibility of restoring Scottish interests to the B division rested on Inverleiths shoulders. Those of you who followed on social media, or who have an interest in Hockey will no doubt already know that they fell agonisingly short of their objective when the Irish Champions equalised with something like 40 secs to go in the final match, which was enough to move Inverleith from 2nd to 3rd place.

 

My role on the trip (and others like it) is essentially to provide the Physiotherapy cover for the team. This can sometimes expand into being almost like a GP in the absence of a team doctor, advising on a variety of health related topics, including nutrition, training, and injuries. The quieter I am the better as this means the players are in good shape. That said due to the brutal nature of tournament Hockey, there is always some work to do due to the quick turn around between matches, the number of matches, and the inevitable competitive and often physical nature of those games. In order to keep the players in good shape and minimise the risk of non-contact injuries as a physio I help advise on, and sometimes take both the warm-ups and cool downs for the team. On this particular trip the team had a well-established protocol for both of these so I merely over saw what they were doing, offering advice and guidance as required. In between games I would offer times for the players to be assessed and treated as required. These sessions have to fit in between team meetings and meals, so in order to avoid everyone coming at the same time, I ran this on an appointment system. This not only helped me work out who was coming when, but also to better manage the limited time we had as I could gauge how long I’d need for each individual, based on what I knew of the reason they were coming to see me for.  Assessing and treating a new injury was likely to take longer than applying a preventative strapping for a known issue for example. Finally during matches my role is to provide medical cover for the team in case of injuries. This is the role most people are familiar with physio’s doing having watched sport on TV, where we run on, assess and treat players (if required), or in more serious cases rule players out of contention as they unable to continue and/or require further investigation of their injury.

 

Hopefully that gives people a little insight as to what a Physio does on foreign trips, though no trip is the same and different squads have different requirements. Everyone at Space is well experienced and feel free to ask us about our experiences if you are curious when you’re in visiting us.

 

Written by Space Clinics

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